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23 FEBRUARY 2018 08:30
Agile Alliance New Zealand


Anthony and Leon
The Conference will be held in Christchurch 2018.
It is part of the Agile Alliance New Zealand initiative to expose IT centers outside Auckland and Wellington to Agile.

The first was held in Tauranga on 29 September 2017
Our Approach
The format was speakers in the morning and open session in the afternoon.
Why Us?
We have people with multiple years of International experience.

We are a not for profit organization that simply wants to promote Agile Software in the New Zealand community because we believe in it.

Get 90% off a 1 year individual membership to Agile Alliance!

All attendees to Agile ChristChurch 2018 will be offered an individual Agile Alliance membership for $10 USD (Save $90). Register on the day.

Conference Details

Where is it?
23 February 2018
Hagley Oval Pavilion

Hagley Oval is located in South Hagley Park – 63 Riccarton Ave.
  • 08:30 Doors Open
  • 08:50 Welcome : Joe Kearns
  • 08:55 And a word from our sponsors.
  • 09:15 The Foundations of Business Agility : Shane Hastie
  • 10:00 Tea Break
  • 10:15 How the Olympics Can Make You a Better Person : Sandy Mamoli
  • 11:00 Lean UX and the Language of Change : Ant Boobier
  • 11:45 Teams: The Not So Secret Sauce to Make Your Teams Responsive: Joe
  • 12:30-13:00 Lunch
  • 13:00-16:00 Openspace Event
  • 16:00 Close
Early Bird: $60 - SOLD OUT

Full Price: $100 (Ends 15 Feb)

Late Price: $150 (End 15 Feb - Will only be released if all the Full price ones are sold - limited due to venue)


Shane Hastie
Sandy Mamoli
The Foundation of Business Agility
How the Olympics can make you a Better Person
In the 21st century, organisations need to:
  • Put the customer in the centre of our focus
  • Shed outdated ways of thinking
  • Embrace an agile mindset
  • Incorporate new ways of working
  • Leverage the pace of change for competitive advantage
This talk explores what it means to be agile in a business context. It looks at the key elements needed, how they are interwoven and what is needed for organisations to transform their thinking and behaviour into new ways of working.Business Agility is about putting the customer at the centre of the organization’s focus, changing from measuring activities to outcomes and creating an ecosystem which unleashes the productivity and innovation already present in the people in the organisation.

About Shane

Director of Agile Learning Programs

Shane Hastie joined ICAgile in 2017 as the Director of Agile Learning Programs.
He has oversight in the strategic direction and expansion of ICAgile’s learning programs, including maintaining and extending ICAgile’s learning objectives, providing thought leadership and collaborating with industry experts, and supporting the larger ICAgile community, which includes more than 90 Member Organizations and approximately 50,000 ICAgile certification holders.

Over the last 30+ years Shane has been a practitioner and leader of developers, testers, trainers, project managers and business analysts, helping teams to deliver results that align with overall business objectives.
He spent 15 years as a professional trainer and consultant specialising in Agile practices, business analysis, project management, requirements, testing and methodologies for SoftEd in Australia, New Zealand and around the world.
In the world of professional sports, innovation, persistence and rapid learning are everything!In this very personal talk former Olympian Sandy Mamoli will share key learnings from her professional sports career.

She will delve into topics such as learning through innovation, rapid feedback, radical candour and high-performance teams.

Sandy will contrast the perspectives and attitudes of professional sports with modern work life and will extract guidelines and tools that we can apply to our professional lives.

About Sandy

Nomad8 - Agile coach and consultant

Sandy Mamoli is an Agile coach and consultant at Nomad8 with a focus on culture and leadership.

She moved to New Zealand in 2007 (for a brief trial period) and has been living in Wellington and Auckland ever since.

Sandy is a former Olympian, a geek, a gadget junkie, international speaker and co-author of "Creating Great Teams - How Self-Selection Lets People Excel (Pragmatic Bookshelf, 2015)".

She holds a masters degree in artificial intelligence and knows quite a lot about Agile.
Ant Boobier
Joe Kearns
Lean UX and the language of change
"Teams: The Not So Secret Sauce to Make Your Teams Responsive"
Lean UX, agile, lean, design thinking, these are philosophies that can cause deep passion and at the same time mass confusion.
How do you stop them being just buzzwords? How do you ensure that the frameworks, practices and people who extol them align, rather than compete against one another?

This talk will show how the language you use has a profound effect on your change; how that language should focus on why you do things and your relationship to your customers, rather than what you do and the frameworks and practices you use.

Learn what language would work for you, and how to use it to create powerful questions that will empower and motivate.

About Ant


Ant Boobier leads a team of coaches at BNZ.

He has been doing agile for more years than he cares to remember; RAD in the 90s, XP in the 2000s and a magic mix of Lean UX and agile today.

He is a people geek who loves a good experiment.
In our working lives nearly everything we do is in teams.

Sometimes we sit in two or three teams with our organisation.

In the Agile world, we hear a lot about the 'cross-functional' team concept and the 'Agile mindset', but often we do little to understand what it means and even less to nurture the skills required within our teams to make them cross-functional or have the right mindset for success.

About Joe Kearns

Double-O Consultants

Joe's been involved in software projects for over 20 years, during which he's seen a lot of good and bad practices.

He draws on his knowledge of Agile, project management and leadership techniques to take a lead role to deliver successful change to client organisations.

Having worked as a Developer, Project Manager, IT Manager, General Manager, Product Owner and Scrum Master, Joe has a lot of software and business experience across a range of roles.


Media Suite
Media Suite
Jade brings new digital ideas to life in industries including energy, insurance, agritech, and retail. With a UX-led approach to defining problems and a methodical, iterative process for solving them, we change people’s real-world experiences with whatever technology fits best.

Thousands of companies around the world rely on Jade every day of the year. With headquarters in Christchurch, Jade have offices in Auckland, Dunedin,Sydney, Melbourne, and the United Kingdom. jadesoftware.com.
Media Suite

our culture

Culture is people. At Media Suite, our people are the core of what we do.

Culture isn't something you can manufacture or force. We believe in hiring the right people who will contribute to, and evolve, the core principles our culture is based on.

flexibility and accountability

learning and growth

people and community

value and integrity
Catalyst is a global team of skilled open source technologists. We're creative, collaborative thinkers and doers solving complex business problems with smart technology solutions. Since 1997, we've been tirelessly championing free and open source software for clients across New Zealand and around the world. At Catalyst, free and open source is not just what we do, it's what we stand for.

Openspace event

Open Space
How to run an open space event
This guide was taken from Transition Network.
How can this help us?
Open Space is a powerful tool for engaging large and small groups of people in discussions to explore particular questions or issues.

It can be used with groups from anything between 10 and 1,000 people.

In Transition it is particularly important because it enables people with ideas and energy to connect creating the opportunity to turn ideas into action.

It is the foremost tool used by Transition groups to move from ‘we have no idea’ to action.
The guide:
Open Space has Four Rules and One Law (the Law of Two Feet), and two insects, and a coffee/tea area.
The Four Rules state:
1. Whoever come are the right people
2. Whatever happens is the only thing that could have
3. Whenever it starts is the right time
4. When it’s over, it’s over
The Law of Two Feet states that:
“If, during the course of the gathering, any person finds themselves in a situation where they are neither learning nor contributing, they can go to some more productive place.”
The insects are:
  • Butterflies.
    • These people hang out, maybe drinking tea, and don’t appear to do much
    • However they may just be involved with the most important discussions of the day
  • Bees.
    • They flit from conversation to conversation bring new ideas, and fresh eyes to the table
    • They can also encourage mingling for those for whom the Law of Two Feet feels a bit rude
You will need the following materials:
  • Lots of marker pens
  • Lots of pieces of paper to write questions on
  • Big pieces of flipchart paper to record discussions
  • Blutack
The question is very important
Key to a successful Open Space event is the question.
The question you ask and how you frame it will determine who comes so be mindful of this.
It can be tempting to just want people who agree with you to turn up, but this will limit the diversity of your group and the success of Transition!
Usually this is in the title of the event as it helps set the ground for what is to be under discussion at the session.
Some examples from Transition Town Totnes have included:
  • How Will Totnes Feed Itself Beyond the Age of Cheap Oil?
  • Powering Totnes Beyond Cheap Oil . . .
  • The Economic Revival of Totnes – how can we build a sustainable, equitable and healthy economy in Totnes?
You may choose to invite specific people, or just leave it open to whoever turns up.

It is important that the question is stated clearly on the invitations and all publicity.
You need a suitable venue
Your venue needs to be:
  • Large enough to take those who attend sitting in a large circle
  • Has walls on which you can stick things
  • Has enough space for several discussions to happen
Running the open space
Setup a circle of chairs so when people arrive they take a seat in the circle (maybe after a cup of tea).
  • In the centre of the circle is a pile of sheets of A4 paper and pens, and on the wall or floor have an empty timetable with the timings of the different sessions on left and the various discussion areas on the top like on the Left
  • Explain to people the four rule, the Law of Two Feet, the insects and how to record discussions.
    You also might include a bit about how to facilitate at the tables.
    For instance making sure one or two voices don’t always dominate discussions, or the art of making people feel safe and welcome so they have the confidence to take part.
  • Then offer people the opportunity to propose a question, if they do this then they must:
    • Host that discussion
    • Record the conversation themselves or arrange someone else to do it for the benefit of anyone unable to participate
    • Write their name on the sheet
  • Then they post the question on the timetable.
  • Then say “Go!”.
    This is the nerve-racking bit.
    You may worry that no one will come forward, but then one person does and often loads more then follow.
    Then the following needs to happen:
    • Ten minutes of people proposing questions and sticking them up on the timetable
    • You may well end up with more questions than you have slots available, in which case put those on similar topics together
    • Once your timetable is full, allow people a few minutes to look at it and work out what they want to go to, and then ring a bell, or something similar, to announce the start of the first session
    • People then go to the space where there question is being hosted and the discussions begin
    • In theory, the rest of the day will organise itself as long as you do the following:
    • Ensure each break-out space has plenty of flip-chart paper and pens
    • Tell people when each session starts, and remind them about the Law of Two Feet
    • At the end of each session, ring a bell to let people know it is finished
    • Go round and collect up the note filled sheets
    • Put them up on the wall in the area you have pre-designated as the ‘Market Place’
    • You may also choose to have someone typing up the sheets, if you are posting the proceedings live on the web or if you want it typed up to send out quickly
    • Leave 30-40 minutes or so at the end to allow one person to feedback from each discussion and for everyone to feedback on the process
    • The notes generated can be typed up and circulated to everyone who attended
Harvesting and Completion
You may decide that this day is about harvesting ideas, and no specific decisions are reached.
Future activities might well emerge from the session, but you might want actions to be agreed and taken forward.
This will determine what shape the closing session takes.

It could be a brief thank you and hope you had a good time, to a more specific planning,setting up working groups or anything else that needs to happen. In which case more time is needed to come to agreements.

Open Space is surprisingly easy to run, and an amazingly powerful way of exploring issues.

What it does is draw out all those who are really passionate about a subject.
For your first one you might find it useful to have someone with prior experience of running Open Space to facilitate it, but once you have a successful Open Space under your belt, you’ll marvel at how simple it is!